American Sporting Art

3278 Franklin Ave.
Millbrook NY, 12545
Phone: 845-605-1130

Richard Lebarre Goodwin (American, 1840 – 1910)

Still-life Small Mouth Bass

20 x 9.5 inches

The son of portraitist Edwin Weyburn Goodwin, he studied at the Art Students League in New York City. Goodwin initially followed in his father’s footsteps as a portraitist; however, in the 1880s, he was heavily influenced by the trompe l’oeil style of painting introduced by William Hartnett. What separates Goodwin from other trompe l’oeil artists of that time is that his large pictures of hanging game and fish are most often presented against cabin doors. Alfred Rubenstein said that Goodwin “…painted portraits for a living and landscapes for love, but above all he delighted in the hunter’s cabin door.” It is reported that in 1905 he got the idea for one of his paintings after he saw an exhibition in Portland, Oregon, which featured the door of the cabin in which Theodore Roosevelt had lived while ranching in the Dakotas. Goodwin was wounded at the Battle of Bull Run during the American Civil War and spent the following 20 years as an itinerant painter in western New York State. It was only in the 1880s, when he settled in Syracuse that he began his “cabin door” still-life painting career. After 1890 Goodwin returned to his peripatetic life-style, living for a while in Washington, D.C., then moving to Chicago in 1893 for the World’s Fair. He remained there for seven years before moving to Colorado Springs, then farther westward to San Francisco, California. He unfortunately lost four years of his artistic endeavors in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire. He moved to Portland, Oregon and in 1908 moved to Rochester, New York and died in Orange, New Jersey in 1910.

For more information on this artwork

Belvoir Gallery - American Sporting Art
3278 Franklin Ave.
Millbrook NY, 12545
Phone: 845-605-1130